?

Log in

No account? Create an account
atom

This Day In History, 2003

The Concorde supersonic transport made its final flight on this date last year.


---
The Concorde makes its final flight

The supersonic Concorde jet made its last commercial passenger flight, traveling at twice the speed of sound from New York City’s John F. Kennedy International Airport to London’s Heathrow Airport on this day in 2003. The British Airways jet carried 100 passengers, including actress Joan Collins, model Christie Brinkley, and an Ohio couple who reportedly paid $60,000 on eBay for two tickets (a roundtrip trans-Atlantic fare typically cost about $9,000). A large crowd of spectators greeted the plane’s arrival in London, which coincided with two other final Concorde flights from Edinburgh and the Bay of Biscay.

The Concorde, which was developed jointly by the British and French governments, began commercial service in January 1976. A significant achievement in aviation technology and design, the sleek, delta-winged planes could make the trip from New York to London in around three and a half hours, traveling at 1,350 miles per hour. The Concorde became a symbol of speed and luxury, although it was not without its problems. Some who lived under its flight path criticized the enormous noise it produced. And, tragically, on July 25, 2000, an Air France jet crashed after takeoff from Paris and 113 people died. All Concorde flights were grounded for over a year after the incident.

Citing rising operating costs and reduced ticket sales, British Airways retired its Concorde fleet in October 2003. Air France, the only other Concorde carrier, had permanently grounded its jets in May 2003. However, the allure of the Concorde was so powerful that when the airlines auctioned off spare parts from their fleets shortly after their retirement, many items sold for significantly more than their suggested price. For example, a blanket valued at $100 sold for $2,000, a door sold for $33,000, and a needle nose sold for $550,000.
---


I personally never had the opportunity to fly the Concorde. However, a friend of mine who is a lawyer in New York City had the opportunity once when flying back from France on business. His ticket had been upgraded to first class, which meant riding on the Concorde, and he told me the story of his experience. It began with the pilot introducing a new crew member to him; apparently, they assumed that all Concorde passengers were repeat customers who got to know the crew. As for the flight itself, he remarked that the food was unimpressive and the in-flight "entertainment," as it were, was a screen on the seat in front of him displaying their current speed in Mach units (Mach 1 being the speed of sound).

Apparently, if you flew the Concorde, they assumed you were paying for speed and not much else.

Comments

When hr_macgirl and I flew Concorde, it was after the announcement that service was ending, so they weren't assuming you were a repeat flyer; many if not most of the passengers were once-in-a-lifetime experience seekers like us, who'd always said "someday" until there wouldn't be a "someday".

320,000 Delta miles later, we had tickets for May 2003; Delta Connection to Montréal, Air France first class to Paris, then on to Manchester UK; return MAN-CDG-JFK/LGA-BOS, with CDG-JFK on Concorde, LGA-BOS on Delta Shuttle. (Eastbound, Concorde was already unavailable for our dates.)

The first class meal was better than the Concorde meal, and had the added attraction of having been served in the lounge at YUL, on a table, though the knife was still plastic.

The aircraft we flew aboard (F-BVFA) is now at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum, Udvar-Hazy Center.
Cool! I now know two people who flew the Concorde.
I'd always hoped to have the chance someday... oh well.
atom

December 2016

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Powered by LiveJournal.com